Jackson and Duplantis win in Brussels but not set world record

BRUSSELS (AFP) – Jamaica’s Sherika Jackson won the 200 meters for the fourth time in history (21.48), and Sweden’s Armand Duplantis once again surpassed six meters (6.10 meters), but neither of them will be in Brussels this Friday. broke the world record in the competition.

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The 29-year-old Jackson has spoken publicly about the record-breaking goal, and the track at the King Baudouin Stadium, a stone’s throw from Brussels’ Atomium, seemed the perfect place for him to unleash all his talents in a half-circle around the track .

The women’s 200m world record, although considered one of the controversial records in track and field, has been held since 1988 by American Florence Griffith-Joyner , who died in 1998 at the age of 38) held at 21.34.

Following this meet in Brussels, Jackson held her best times of second (21.41), third (21.45) and fourth (21.48) in the women’s 200m. Just two weeks ago, he scored a victory at the World Championships in Budapest with a time of 21.41.

“I’m very happy with my career. I feel really good and I believe this record is going to come and I’m getting closer to it,” she revealed on Friday.

Shericka Jackson, also a double world runner-up in the 100 meters (2022 and 2023), plans to end her outdoor season at the Diamond League finals in Eugene (Ore.) mid-month.

He will also participate in that competition in the United States and once again challenge the world record of Swede Duplantis, who failed to reach the level of 6.23 meters.

Duplantis set the Belgian meet record with 6.10m, but this was his fourth attempt over 6.23m, one centimeter above his current record of 6.22m, which he set in Clermont-Ferrand, France, in February Created indoors.

Sweden's Armand Duplantis wins at the Brussels Athletics Games. Brussels on September 8, 2023
Sweden’s Armand Duplantis wins at the Brussels Athletics Games. Brussels on September 8, 2023 © John Teese/AFP

Before Brussels, “Mondo” had faced the challenge of 6.23 meters at the Stockholm meeting in July, the world finals in Budapest in August and last week’s Zurich meeting.

“I thought I could do it today, which is a shame. But my jump was bad. Even in the last 6.23m I wasn’t very far, but it wasn’t a super jump,” Duplantis explained .

Although this record goal was not achieved, his victory in Brussels was unquestionable and clear again. He is the only one over six meters tall.

Sam Kendricks of the United States and EJ Obiena of the Philippines ranked second and third respectively, both with a score of 5.92 meters.

Ingebrigtsen certainly achieved this goal

The world record was set in Brussels by Norwegian Jakob Ingebrigtsen, albeit at the undisputed distance of 2,000 meters, with a time of 4 minutes, 43 seconds and 13 seconds.

Norwegian Jakob Ingebrigtsen celebrates his world record victory in the 2000m at the Brussels Athletics Meet. Brussels on September 8, 2023
Norwegian Jakob Ingebrigtsen celebrates his world record victory in the 2000m at the Brussels Athletics Meet. Brussels on September 8, 2023 © John Teese/AFP

It is the 22-year-old Nordic athlete’s first outdoor world record, improving on the previous record by more than a second and a half, which was set by Moroccan Hicham El Guerrouj in 1999. It was set in 2018 with a time of 4 minutes and 44.79 seconds.

Current Olympic 1,500m champion Ingebritsen is the indoor world record holder for the 1.5km distance (3:30.60) since February 2022. European record holder in the outdoor 1,500m (3:27.14).

Whether it is the World Cup or the Olympics, 2000 meters is not a competition event.

In the remaining tests in Brussels on Friday, Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson-Herah won the 100m in 10.84. The current double Olympic champion in the 100m and 200m is going through a bad season and this one has given her hope, first of all, to gain confidence for Paris 2024.

In the 400-meter hurdles event, Dutch player Femke Bol achieved her favorite state and won the championship with a time of 52.11.

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