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NASA successfully launched DART, its “suicide” ship to deflect asteroids and protect Earth

In the best “Armageddon” style (1998), the NASA finally successfully launched the first mission planetary defense to test the possibility of divert the address of an asteroid in case it rushes towards Earth

The mission DART, short for Double Asteroid Redirection Test, was launched from the Vandenberg Space Force Base in California. The rocket is scheduled to deliberately collide with an asteroid to deflect it from its orbit in order to test the technology that would be necessary to avoid a possible collision with our planet.

Read also: Mars: Perseverance found olivine crystal, a material used in jewelry linked to the origin of life on Earth

The impact will not occur until autumn (boreal) of 2022 (spring for Argentina)but, if successful, it has the potential to lay the foundation to protect all of humanity from apocalyptic danger of asteroids, according to NASA.

The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is launched with the DART on board, from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California (Photo: AFP).
The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket is launched with the DART on board, from Space Launch Complex 4E at Vandenberg Space Force Base in California (Photo: AFP).

What will the DART mission be like to deflect asteroids

It is the first NASA trial to investigate the possibility of deflecting an asteroid, intentionally crashing a ship space against him. The DART mission, of $ 325 million, enters orbit on a Falcon 9 rocket from SpaceX, the company of eccentric Elon Musk.

The probe will pass almost a year traveling to an asteroid system more than 10.5 million kilometers from Earth.

The objective of the mission is Dimorphos, a space rock that is 160 meters wide (20 meters more than the width of Avenida 9 de Julio), which surrounds a much larger asteroid called Didymos (780 meters in diameter).

The DART spacecraft, short for Double Asteroid Redirection Test, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket after its launch (Photo: AP).
The DART spacecraft, short for Double Asteroid Redirection Test, aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket after its launch (Photo: AP).

NASA will crash the spacecraft into Dimorphos at a speed of about 24,140 kilometers per hour.

Telescopes on Earth have been studying Didymos and its “little moon” Dimorphos for decades, and have observed that smallest space rock surrounds its larger counterpart once every 11 hours and 55 minutesexplained Nancy Chabot, a planetary scientist at Johns Hopkins University of Applied Physics.

Chabot, who is also head of mission coordination, wants to see with his colleagues if the cosmic collision can alter the orbit of Dimorphos.

NASA image after the launch of Falcon 9 with the DART on board (Photo: EFE).
NASA image after the launch of Falcon 9 with the DART on board (Photo: EFE).

“This will not destroy the asteroidIt will just give you a little nudge, ”he said. “It’s actually going to deflect its way around the largest asteroid, so we are demonstrating asteroid deflection in this double asteroid system.”

Will DART’s collision with the asteroid be seen?

NASA estimates that the maneuver should be detectable by telescopes terrestrial.

The DART probe will be destroyed in the test but a small Italian-built cube, which the spacecraft will deploy more than a week before crashing, will transmit photos of the impact and its consequences.

The memory of “Armageddon”: the Hollywood movie that anticipated the DART mission

The project is “a kind of movie replay starring actor Bruce Willis, ‘Armageddon‘although that was totally fictional, “NASA Administrator Bill Nelson told the New York Times.

Poster "Armageddon" (1998), the film in which Bruce Willis is part of a space mission to destroy a giant asteroid on a collision course with Earth.
Poster for “Armageddon” (1998), the film in which Bruce Willis is part of a space mission to destroy a giant asteroid on a collision course with Earth.

In Michael Bay’s movie, Willis and Ben Affleck played the oil drillers in a space mission to destroy a giant asteroid on a collision course with Earth.

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TAMMY SEWELL

Tammy Sewell is our Writer and Social at OICanadian.com. Tammy loves sports, she writes our celebrities news. She spends time browsing through several celebs news sources as well the Instagram. Email: Tammy@oicanadian.com Phone: +1 513-209-1700

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