Health

Staying physically active protects against brain aging

A new study involving older adults reported that reducing microglial activation may help support the protective effects of physical activity on cognitive functioning (REUTERS)
A new study involving older adults reported that reducing microglial activation may help support the protective effects of physical activity on cognitive functioning (REUTERS)

Stay physically active as we get older substantially reduces our risk of developing dementia during our lifetime and does not require prolonged exercise.

Walking or moving, rather than sitting, may be all that is needed to help strengthen the brain, and a new study of the University of California can help explain why.

Research has long shown that exercise in middle age and beyond It can reduce the chance of dementia, which is most commonly caused by Alzheimer’s, by up to 40%. Now, researchers say that the disease can be prevented if people also exercise in adulthood.

It is believed that the exercise helps prevent disease because improves cognitive function, keeps body weight low and prevents plaque formation in the arteries, a key cause of vascular dementia. But the latest study also suggests that exercise in adulthood can reduce inflammation in the brain, which can lead to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers studied 167 people with an average age of 90 at the age of death. Those who exercised regularly had a lower level of activation of microglia, a cell that can cause inflammation, in their brains. The scientists said this helped significantly reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s.

The California study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, found that exercise had the greatest benefits for those most likely to develop dementia (Getty Images)
The California study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, found that exercise had the greatest benefits for those most likely to develop dementia (Getty Images)

The study of California, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, found that exercise it had the greatest benefits for those who were most likely to develop dementia.

Researchers followed adults since 1997 to examine the relationship between physical activity and microglial activation.. The study’s lead author, Dr. Kaitlin Casaletto, of the University of California at San Francisco, said: “The microglia, the brain’s resident immune cells, are activated to remove debris and foreign invaders from the brain. But too much activation can trigger inflammation, damage neurons, and disrupt brain signaling. Exercise helps reduce abnormal activation in animals, but that link has not been established in humans. “

The participants were part of the project Rush Memory and Aging, enrolling volunteers without dementia who accept organ donation. Almost two-thirds (60%) had developed Alzheimer’s disease at the time of their death. Everybody used activity monitors 24 hours a day for up to ten days in a row before annual cognitive exams. The researchers measured the activation of microglia and Alzheimer’s disease in brain tissue after their death.

“Greater physical activity was related to less microglial activation. This was particularly in the inferior temporal gyrus, a region of the brain most affected by Alzheimer’s. Physical activity had a more pronounced effect on inflammation in people with more severe Alzheimer’s disease, “he added. Casaletto.

Alzheimer's disease is responsible for between 60 and 80% of dementia cases in the world.  The most important known risk factor is being over 65 (Christin Klose)
Alzheimer’s disease is responsible for between 60 and 80% of dementia cases in the world. The most important known risk factor is being over 65 (Christin Klose)

The study did not specify how long participants exercised or how much exercise reduced the chance of Alzheimer’s disease. However, doctors recommend that healthy adults perform at least 150 minutes of moderate exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week.

Then the doctor Casaletto plans to examine whether exercise interventions can alter microglial activation in Alzheimer’s patients. “Physical activity is related to better cognitive aging and a lower risk of neurodegenerative disease. Even so, the cellular and molecular pathways that link behavior to the brain in humans are unknown ”, Held.

And he concluded: “We objectively monitor physical activity and cognitive performance in life and quantify microglial activation and synaptic markers in brain tissue at the time of death in older adults. These are the first data to support microglial activation as a physiological pathway why physical activity is related to brain health in humans. Although more interventionist work is needed, We suggest that physical activity may be a modifiable behavior that is used to reduce pro-inflammatory microglial states in humans ”.

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. It manifests itself with the progressive loss of memory and other cognitive abilities that interfere with daily life. Yes OK It develops more in people over 65 years of age, it can also affect younger people.

With the advancement of scientific research, it is now known that in Latin America the risk of dementias such as Alzheimer’s can be reduced by 56% if the factors for its prevention are better controlled.

KEEP READING:

The Science Against Alzheimer’s: There are more than 130 ongoing clinical trials, including a nasal vaccine
The “castle of the madman”, the first patient diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and the doctor who discovered madness
Coffee and tea reduce the risk of stroke and dementia

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HELEN HERNANDEZ

Helen Hernandez is our best writer. Helen writes about social news and celebrity gossip. She loves watching movies since childhood. Email: Helen@oicanadian.com Phone : +1 281-333-2229

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