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Federal Council for the Prevention of Health Risks (Cofepris) Be wary of consuming “poppers” products, Used for recreational purposes because, in addition to their addictive properties, they contain highly toxic, irritating, volatile and flammable chemicals.

Cofepris found that these products, which are typically sold in liquid form and packaged in vials for inhalation, have become popular among youth and adolescents.

Some uses of “poppers” are as psychoactive substances and/or sexual stimulants. These products produce a state of euphoria and non-inhibition, which may increase unsafe sex, leading to the acquisition of sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Consumption of “poppers” can irritate the respiratory tract and cause breathing difficulties; chronic cough; bronchitis; and lipoid pneumonia. It can also cause eye injuries, vision impairment, and in some cases, vision loss.

Let’s share the characteristics and chemical safety of nitrite contained in “popcorn”:

substance describe chemical safety
Amyl nitrite Despite its fruity, aromatic and penetrating taste, it is harmful if ingested and inhaled. Flammable

annoying

Isopropyl nitrite Toxic in contact with skin and if ingested. It can cause severe skin burns, eye damage and respiratory irritation. Flammable

corrosive

acute toxicity irritation

Butyl nitrite Even though its aroma is pleasant, it can be toxic if ingested and inhaled. It is used to make fuel for jet aircraft. Flammable

acute poisoning

Isobutyl nitrite Its intake is harmful.Acute toxicity warning if inhaled Flammable

annoying

Cofepris therefore advises the general population not to acquire or use these substances and to avoid combining them with other legal or illegal substances as their consumption may pose health risks.

If you see a product with the characteristics shown, do not purchase the product and for information about possible marketing, please file an appropriate health complaint online: gob.mx/cofepris Or call 800 033 5050.

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